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Dreams An Introduction To The Universal Language of Mind

April 30th, 2014

Dreams An Introduction To The Universal Language of Mind

Dreams: An Introduction To The Universal Language of Mind

By: Luke Galutia
originally posted 2013-06-11
Galutia Gallery ( www.galutia.com )

The Universal Language of Mind
As visual artists, we are able to portray the world around us in images. A picture speaks a thousand words, because whenever we have a thought or idea, we first create a picture of the thought before we put words to it. This is the way the Mind works. In the field of Metaphysics we have a saying, “Thoughts are things ~ and they will manifest!” Which means that our thoughts are the cause of the reality around us. The quality of our thought determines the positive or negative experience, as we attract those events into our daily lives. They become a mirror for seeing our inner Self. It is not surprising that a lot of the people I met at the College of Metaphysics in Windyville Missouri, were graphics designers, multimedia artists, and painters.

Artists have a unique subconscious ability to understand how the Mind works. As an artist, we thrive off of images, and use them to effect change in the physical reality around us, and influence the world. But how do we harness this awareness to work for us? What exactly is the Universal Language of Mind?

The Universal Language of Mind, is a system of understanding the dream symbols that each and every person on the face of the earth has. It is universal because it applies to anyone one, anywhere, at any time. The college of Metaphysics has developed and refined the technique of dream interpretation for over 40 years. Their work is based off of Jungian Psychology, and the dream interpretations given by Edgar Casey. They have refined this to a practical art of interpreting dreams at coffee shops, National Dream Hotline events, and their online educational course www.dreamschool.org.

In the realm of the Subconscious Mind, when we dream each night, we see images which are a reflection of the quality of our thoughts from the previous three days. This language of the Mind operates off of symbols by recognising their “Function” instead of their “Form”. In the Subconscious Mind it is the symbols “Function” which is important. Not only can the Universal Language of Mind be applied to dreams, Holy Works and religious texts, it can also be applied to art!

So what are the meanings of some of these symbols? For those who are truly interested in this course of study, I would recommend picking the School of metaphysics “The Dreamer’s Dictionary” which is a wonderful introduction into the Universal Language of Mind. This book can be found on http://www.som.org in their book store. another source to check is http://www.kellysullivanwalden.com who is a dream thearapist, and has wonderful books on dream symbols, and how dreams work. Kelly Walden also provides dream interpretation services as well as the books she writes. I would strongly recommend both her site, and http://www.dreamschool.org . For those who are wanting a quicker answer, I will describe below a few common dream symbols which every one has in their dreams, and what that symbol means.

symbols and their meanings:
Houses
A house in our dreams represent our Mind. At the School of Metaphysics they always start off a dream interpretation by saying “Every dream is about the dreamer...” In the waking state, your house contains all your “stuff”. Likewise in the Mind, a house is a symbol of that which contains all your thoughts. The first level of a house symbolizes the Conscious Mind. this represents both the inner and outer expression of your daily life, your external world, and the way you internally experience it though your perspective and attitude towards it. We call this objective and subjective realities, or “Reality” and “Actuality”. The physical events of your daily life are always neutral - how we act or react to them, our perspective and attitude, color the event and give an emotional charge to the circumstances.

A basement or garage in a dream symbolizes becoming unconscious or unaware of ourself. This is where we store things that we don’t want to deal with on a daily bases. The second level of a house will symbolize the Subconscious Mind - which is different from becoming unconscious. The Subconscious Mind deals in truth. It gives to you an unfiltered perspective of your thoughts and daily life. By becoming aware of your thoughts and your dreams, you become more in touch with your “Whole Self”. The Subconscious Mind is also associated with our emotions. The function of our emotions is to point our attention to something in our life that needs changing. Emotions act in the Subconscious Mind and react in the physical waking state. Emotions help by pushing ideas out from the Subconscious Mind out into the physical world. The Subconscious Mind is the realm of desire. It is the desire for learning about the true Self, by gaining Permanent Understandings from the Conscious Mind. The third level of a house or an attic represents the highest level of Mind, called the Super Conscious Mind. This level of Mind works with our “Ideals”, goals, and thought. This is what most people would call our “God-Self” as it accesses the highest level possible. This is the core idea of who we are as a person, what our life goals are, and our plan to manifest them. When we tap into this level of the Mind, we experience enlightenment.

An exception to the rule are hotels, shopping malls, or other buildings when groups of people meet. these are areas of the Subconscious Mind where we connect to the Mass Subconscious Mind where we all interact together as souls. Churches, Mosques, Synagogues, and Ashrams also have a special meaning as these are structures of the mind which symbolise your connection with the Superconscious Mind.

Water
Water in our dreams symbolizes our Conscious life experiences. When we see rain, this is usually a sense of life experience, raining down on us from heaven. A river symbolizes a constantly moving life experience. If it is slow and leisurely, there has been a peaceful experience of life which is creating learning. If the river is fast with many rapids and torrents of water, there has been an experience of uncontrollable learning in your daily life.

The ocean would symbolize a wealth and depth of conscious life experience. A beach would symbolize the Emotional Level of Mind, as this is where the Subconscious Mind and Conscious Mind meet, when you start to fall asleep at night. Flooding and drowning in a dream, would symbolize the feeling of drowning or sinking in an uncontrollable torrent of life experiences. There is often an inability to learn from such events as it often feels overwhelming to us.

Vehicles
Cars, and vehicles in our dreams, represent our physical body. When you have a dream about being in a car, pay attention to who is driving. is it you or someone else? Driving along a road, is a symbol for traveling along your life path, in your physical daily life.

Certain vehicles have a greater symbolic meaning. busses planes and boats, all represent groups and organizations. In the field of metaphysics we call these “Group Mind”, “Mass-Consciousness” or “Egregores”. They are constructs of thought in the Subconscious Mind that develop an Ego, or life form of their own when expressed in the physical. A good example of this are corporations, which are business entities. They are accessed by an identification with that group or organization. such as “I am a christian”, “I am Jewish” or “I am an American”... all of these identification are attachments to an organized thought form, they can be so large that they exist beyond lifetimes.

Animals
Most often when we see an animal in our dreams, they will be a habit of one form or another. This is not true in all cases but for the most general explanation it is true. If the dream symbols is a dog or a cat, these will usually be our creature comforts. They are habits that make us feel comfortable by doing them. Bugs and insects are usually small routine habits we have each day to get us from point A to point B. An example would be tying our shoes in the morning or brushing our teeth. They can also be associated with pessimistic or negative thinking. Big scary animals will usually be a habit we do not want to face, as doing so would require change in our daily life, which can become uncomfortable.

Here are some exceptions to the general rule. Horses, and beast of burden such as donkeys, oxen, buffaloes, and deer represent our will power. Horses and oxen are are strong and they are able to go great distances and carry stuff. It could be said that it is the development of the habit of using will power. Another symbol which has a different meaning, is reptiles, snakes, and dragons. Throughout time and history, snakes have always been associated with the creative force in human kind. From places like Egypt which had the serpent on the crown of the Pharaoh, and “Sybec” their crocodile deity of prophecy, to India which has the practice of Yoga and the Kundalini serpent, rising up the spine. It is even found in Judaism and Christianity, in the form of Moses putting down his staff which becomes the “Tanin” or crocodile serpent, and after picking it up, it becomes strate. Also the serpent placed on the pole for healing people from the bitter waters. The last symbol which has a different meaning is that of birds. Birds usually symbolize thought forms which are fleeting or come from “above”. The kind of bird will usually determine the quality of thought. Eagles are associated with the thought form of freedom - which incidentally - flying in a dream is a representation of experiencing freedom in the waking state. Crows, blackbirds and vultures would symbolize focusing or experience fleeting negative thoughts during the day. Doves would symbolize a Super Conscious thought form experienced the day before.

Applying the Universal Language of Mind to Art
These are a few examples of dream symbols and their meanings in the Universal Language of Mind. The next time you go to a gallery, or paint a picture, or even watch a movie, try and look for symbols and what they might mean in the Universal Language of Mind. This will create a wealth of richness in experiencing new art, with an eye towards the inner workings of the Subconscious Mind. my bet is, your viewing experience will never be the same.

- Luke Galutia
2013-06-11

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Luke Galutia has been in the fine arts since 1989, and has won awards for
his art. His artwork has been recognized as being cutting-edge Optical
Illusion Art, and is hosted as part of a permanent collection in the
Washington State Governor's Art Collection in the Olympia Capitol
Building.

Email: lgalutia@gmail.com
Website portfolio: www.galutia.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/lukegalutia
Google+:https://google.com/+LukeGalutia
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lgalutia
Linkedin: https:// www.linkedin.com/in/lukegalutia/
Tumblr: http://lgalutia.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/LukeGalutia/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Quality of Watercolor Paper

April 30th, 2014

Quality of Watercolor Paper

Quality of Watercolor Paper

By: Luke Galutia
originally posted 2013-06-07
Galutia Gallery ( www.galutia.com )


My art teacher in high school, introduced me to the wonderful world of watercolor painting. Before this I thought of watercolor as “kids paint”, used only on crappy printer paper. The first thing she taught me, was that good watercolor paper was the key to a great watercolor painting.

Paper making is actually an art form in itself. Watercolor paper differs from standard paper, due to its quality of production, and the material which goes into it. Usually watercolor paper is made from cotton and linen fiber which has been mulched up in a big tub of water. A mesh is run through the pulp in the water and collected on a screen mesh, which is later left out to dry, and sometimes passed through a machine pressed. When it is not pressed it is usually in a blotter paper form. high quality paper will be acid free - museum grade paper, which is what everyone should use for their artworks. Acid free paper, means that the paper can be preserved for decades because there is no acid in it. Acid in normal paper, yellows or dulls the paper and makes it brittle and crumbly over time. High quality paper, has a professional “nape” or surface on the paper, which are little teeth of fiber that absorbs or holds the medium which is applied to it.

High quality paper can make the difference between something that looks like a preschooler made it, and a masterpiece of art. Watercolor paper comes in different grades, determined by the weight of the paper. The weight of the paper is measured by the “ream” of paper, which consists of 500 sheets of paper. This is usually in the papers uncut state.

The three typical weights are:

90 pound weight ~ Student grade paper. It is prone to buckling and warping in moisture and the nape does not hold up too much scrubbing, or extensive layering of watercolor.

140 pound weight ~ Medium grade pape. This is adequate for the low budget artist. This grade can be soaked and stretched on a balsa wood board to prevent warping and buckling. You can usually find this in notebook reams of various sizes in your local art store. The biggest size will usually be something like 18 X 20 inches for $22 a spiral notebook. I would recommend this for most starting artists.

300 pound weight ~ Professional grade paper. It is usually stiff and thick like a piece of matting board. This paper will usually cost about $10 to $14 per piece of paper. I would recommend getting this type once you have mastered your brush technique. They will also sell this in your local art store, in single sheets or in reams of paper wrapped in plastic. This can get kind of expensive but its definitely worth it!

In my last blog posting I talked about how to stretch the paper. There are two ways to do this. The best way ~ in my humble opinion, is to soak the paper in hot water, and staple or use thumbtacks to stretch it on balsa wood board. The pin holes left in the paper gives kind of a gritty effect to the sides of the paper that I like when I paint. however some people don’t really care for this. The second way, you can either get art tape, and tape the edges of the paper to a balsa wood board, or get a professional paper stretching board which has a metal clamp type frame that goes around the edges of the paper and keeps it in place. You can get them online at art websites or in your local art store. It all depends on your preference.

The cool thing about high grade watercolor paper, is that it can be used for different kinds of mediums. Such as, tempra (egg paint), gouache ( kind of a thicker watercolor paint), india ink, acrylic paint, pastel chalk, and oil pastels. Watercolor paper is a good general paper to use for almost any art project. Sometimes when I want to do art and I don’t have enough money to afford a canvas I will use watercolor paper instead, depending on the project.

I hope this blog provides some useful information to starting artists out there looking for some help. Keep up the great art!

- Luke Galutia
2013-06-07


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Luke Galutia has been in the fine arts since 1989, and has won awards for
his art. His artwork has been recognized as being cutting-edge Optical
Illusion Art, and is hosted as part of a permanent collection in the
Washington State Governor's Art Collection in the Olympia Capitol
Building.

Email: lgalutia@gmail.com
Website portfolio: www.galutia.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/lukegalutia
Google+:https://google.com/+LukeGalutia
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lgalutia
Linkedin: https:// www.linkedin.com/in/lukegalutia/
Tumblr: http://lgalutia.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/LukeGalutia/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

What Medium Should I Start With?

April 30th, 2014

What Medium Should I Start With?

What Medium Should I Start With?
By: Luke Galutia
originally posted 2013-06-05
Galutia Gallery ( www.galutia.com )

Choosing a medium
Chances are if you have found this blog, you are a starting artist and have either googled this question, or found my post on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+. When beginning to learn a new skill, you often do not know where to start. Especially in the art world there are many choices out there, and it is often hard to tell what to get, what you’ll need, and how much it will cost. I have been painting now for close to 25 years. In that time I have learned to master 4 mediums of art, those being acrylic, oil, watercolor, and acid etching on glass and mirrors. In this blog I want to go over some of the strong points and learning curves of the three main staples of painting mediums ~ acrylic, oil, and watercolor.

Each medium has its strong points and also its learning curves. Oil paint has very rich textures and colors and is great for using “Impasto” technique on canvas or masonite panel. Its downside is that it can take FOREVER for it to dry and is not that friendly to having a child around, due to the toxicity of some of the compounds in the paint, and long drying times. Not to mention its flammable. Also in order to clean the brushes you will need turpentine or something similar, and need to find a way that is eco friendly to dispose of used turpentine when it is no longer useful for cleaning brushes. Acrylic has the quick drying time and a “similar” texture to oil paint, and is a less expensive medium to work in than oil. The learning curve is not quite as great with acrylic as it is with oil paint. plus acrylic has great glossy coat products that makes you painting look like stained glass which rocks! I love that stuff. Watercolor is the next choice, and is often overlooked by starting artist as being “kids paint”. Watercolor is cheap to buy supplies for. Watercolor paper you can get a fairly decent size of paper in a spiral bound stack for around $20, which is museum quality and acid free. Brushes will be the most expensive item you will buy for watercolor painting. The downside - it's also the most expensive to frame, and its lightfastness is a little less than oil or acrylic. Usually once you have been painting for a while you begin to find a preferred medium. For me, it depends on what mood i’m in.

The Alchemy of Watercolor
Watercolor is a very overlooked medium and here is why. Most beginning artist view watercolor as a “kids paint” like crayola. On the other end people who have started off with oil or acrylic are use to the heavy body paints, and have a steep learning curve when learning to paint in watercolors. You will often hear the statement that watercolor a is very hard medium to control because it is watery. I myself, did not start painting with watercolor until I went to art class at Selah high school in Selah Washington in 1994. I was fortunate to have a teacher who was a master watercolor artist. What Mrs. Tharp taught me in watercolor painting help me to apply to techniques in the other mediums I work in today. It is for this reason, that today when every I teach someone who is starting to paint, I will start them off with watercolor. If you master watercolor technique, you can paint in any other medium.

Before painting in watercolor I had no idea you could do such cool things with the medium which literally is like magical alchemy. There are techniques you can do with salt or alcohol to the wet paint that gives amazing effects on the paper and uses it to move the paint around the paper. This will sound funny to most people, but the use of crayons also has some practical uses as well.

The first thing I will tell a starting artist, is to learn the different brush techniques. Keep in mind, that when painting in watercolor, you are effectively “staining” the paper, rather than getting a thick paste of paint and spreading on top of the paper. This is what throws off most artists, when coming from acrylic or oil. The main techniques for brush work are:

1) Wet on wet = Using extremely diluted paint in water, and applying it to a soaking wet piece of watercolor paper. This gives the benefit of having the paint diffuse into the surrounding water and gives a swish like effect as the paint follows the water flows across the paper. Very cool effect. It is best to use cold water for this kind of effect. Its realy good for background layers in a painting.

2) Wet on dry = Using extremely diluted watercolor paint and applying it to a dry surface on watercolor paper. This gives the effect of having a hard line or a lip around the area of the brush stroke. This gives well defined edges while inside the brush stroke, it still gives a watery swish effect.

3) Dry on wet = Using this technique gives a very strong amount of paint at the center where the brush touches the wet paper, and fans out in a swish effect as the concentrated paint diffuses into the surrounding water. This gives really rich colors in the center of the brush stroke, and is good for foreground objects in the painting.

4) Dry on dry = Useful for foreground and detail painting. It is applied by either having a slightly diluted to very thick paste of watercolor paint on the brush and applying it directly to the dry paper.

When you use watercolor paint, you are staining the paper. because of this, you always work in layers while you paint. It is always a good idea to take a light quality pencil and draw faint lines on the paper. The first layers of paint will be very very faint as you will want to build up the painting from the background first, then the middle ground, and finally the foreground. After applying each layer allow the paper to fully dry. One cool feature with watercolor, is that rings will develop in the paint as it dries, creating lips of where the paint stained, and then dried, giving the brush strokes a watery effect. This is painting with Alchemy. you are letting the elements of nature move the paint for you, thus the elemental forces of nature become your brush.

Creating white spaces
One area which is a learning curve for watercolor is how to create a true white color. For some effects like drawing faint white lines you can use a white watercolor paint ~ but it doesn’t show up very well. If you want to keep an area white, a good technique is to use a transparent or white crayon after sketching your outline on the paper. You can also use specialized White Mask Liquid Frisket medium to cover the area as well, and then scrape off the medium once you are done ~ however this risks ruining the “nape” or teeth of the surface of the paper, which gives the surface its stain retention abilities.

Preparing the paper
One thing about watercolor paper is that it is mostly cotton, which means that it has a long lasting life. However this also makes it prone to shrinking and warping in moisture from the atmosphere, and most importantly ~ when you paint. In order to avoid this, you will need to stretch your watercolor paper. You will need to get a balsa wood board from your art supply store. You can also use plywood ~ which is not quite so good, but is a cheap alternative. You will also need thumbtacks or a stapler. First either in a large tub or sink, run hot water until you have depth enough to put in the entire paper. Place it in the water and let it sit for five to 10 minutes to get good and soggy.

once the paper has sat long enough, carefully take out the paper, by only touching the outer edge of the paper, or using rubber gloves. The oil on your finger tips leaves marks on the paper the keeps the medium from spreading around evenly. this care should also be used with all your brushes as well.

Place the wet paper on the balsa board, and staple the outer edges about 4 to 6 inches apart. It is best to allow the paper to fully dry, so you can apply your base sketch to the dry paper. It is a good idea to have a clear working space for painting in watercolor like a table or a workhorse type bench to lay the paintings on, as you really can’t put a wet watercolor painting on an easel like you can with oil and acrylic. This way you will not have to paint on the floor which can make your back hurt after long periods of painting and waiting for it to dry while walking around your painting space.

A good rule of thumb to remember while watercolor painting, is hot water is good for fast drying and quick staining of the paint on the surface of the paper. Cold water is good for slower staining which you will want for special techniques. I mostly use cold water when i paint, and hot water when i stretch a paper. Some people try to speed up the dry time of a painting by using a blow dryer. I would not recommend this as it can burn or brown the paint pigments and gum arabic binding medium by scorching them. This is a good reason to have two or more balsa wood boards available, in order to keep actively painting while waiting for the first one to dry.

This has been a brief introduction to choosing a medium, most preferably watercolor. When you master watercolor painting, you can master any other medium available. Good luck, now go and create great art!

- Luke Galutia 2013-06-05
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Luke Galutia has been in the fine arts since 1989, and has won awards for
his art. His artwork has been recognized as being cutting-edge Optical
Illusion Art, and is hosted as part of a permanent collection in the
Washington State Governor's Art Collection in the Olympia Capitol
Building.

Email: lgalutia@gmail.com
Website portfolio: www.galutia.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/lukegalutia
Google+:https://google.com/+LukeGalutia
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lgalutia
Linkedin: https:// www.linkedin.com/in/lukegalutia/
Tumblr: http://lgalutia.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/LukeGalutia/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Lightfastness and Quality Paint

April 30th, 2014

Lightfastness and Quality Paint

Lightfastness and Quality Paint
By: Luke Galutia
Originally posted 2013-06-05
Galutia Gallery ( www.galutia.com )

LightFastness

If you are like me, you don’t always have a lot of money to spend on art products. I have been painting since 1989, and for most of my art career I have used the $1 paint from the craft stores. That all changed about two years ago when I discovered what lightfastness is.

Lightfastness is the rating of the permanence of a pigment. It is the amount of time that a pigment takes to fade. This is determined by the quality of pigment used, the medium of the paint such as acrylic, oil or watercolor, and the concentration of the pigment in the medium. The more higher quality paint will most generally use only one high quality pigment in their paint. This pigment is densely packed in a high quality medium such as an acrylic polymer. The higher quality paints also keep from color shifting which is the paint changing color as it dries. Usually lower quality paint darkens as it dries.

These are the lightfastness ratings:
ASTM I — Excellent Lightfastness
ASTM II — Very Good Lightfastness
ASTM III — Not Sufficiently Lightfast to be used in artists’ paints

Note that there are some pigments such as arizona crimson that have a lesser lightfast value even though it is in the professional level paint brands. this is due to the nature of the pigment which is used. it has a natural tendency to fade quicker then most other pigments. it is usually rated as ASTM II. Also Watercolor in general has a lower lightfast quality compared to oil and acrylic. This is due to the medium in which the pigment is bound. There are ways to work around this though, usually through quality watercolor paper which is museum grade and acid free, using UV protected glass for the paintings frame, and keeping out of direct sunlight.
UV light will significantly breakdown and degrade pigment in paint.

Once I discovered this I changed my mentality instantly. For me, when I create art, I am doing it to create a remembrance of who I am, my spiritual journey, and what I experience when I dream or meditate. The thought that, for years I had used such poor quality of paint which would fade quickly, was not very comforting to me. For years I refused to buy the more expensive paint as it thought I was all about the art company trying to make a buck off artist who lacked the money to pay for it. I was totally wrong. Now that I understand “why” it is so expensive it makes more sense to me. The reason why I am writing this is, I have take art class for years, and painted most of my life, and I either didn’t understand, or was totally ignorant of what lightfastness was. So I hope to enlighten people who are just beginning to paint, that yes there is a reason to get the good paint ~ even if it is just the student grade paint from a good company.


Good quality paint companies
Fortunately most of the paints out these days in the art store usually has good lightfast qualities even the “student paint”, which if you are starting out in painting - this is a really good option, until you are able to master the medium. Here are the top three paint companies that will get you started painting.

For acrylic paint here are some really good quality companies and the link to their product page:

http://www.winsornewton.com/
http://acrylics.winsornewton.com/en/

One of the major brands that I uses is winsor newton, so far I have only had the opportunity to use their galeria paint for acrylic. I hope someday (once I have the extra money) to buy their Artist Acrylic, Oil and Watercolor brand. The galeria brand is pretty decent it is a medium quality paint but has as great of lightfast qualities as their professional grade “Artist’s” line. The one thing that creates the difference between the grades is the specialized acrylic polymer they use for the Artist’s professional grade paint. The only thing that I think they really need to focus on is opalescent paints and metal colors such as silver and gold - which I use, especially a lot of the opalescent paint (pearl white) in almost all my paintings for special effects. The stuff is magick when you add glossy coat over it!



www.goldenpaints.com

The Golden Paint company is another really good high quality professional level paint. fortunately for me, they DO have opalescents, so I usually go for this brand when ever I need to paint something gold, silver, or pearl color like aura fields. I have not had a chance to use their standard colors, but the opalescent paints are pretty cool.


http://www.liquitex.com/

I have used this brand for glossy coat and some of their cheaper bottle paints for a long time. They offer four lines of paint. They are a common name in art products and are fairly trusted. they have some interesting mediums and varnishes and heavy body base paints.


I hope that this blog has been a good introduction to the concept of lightfastness and color shift. Hopefully it will help starting artist to avoid some mistakes early on that I wish someone had told me when I started. Keep creating great art!

- Luke Galutia
2013-06-05
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Luke Galutia has been in the fine arts since 1989, and has won awards for
his art. His artwork has been recognized as being cutting-edge Optical
Illusion Art, and is hosted as part of a permanent collection in the
Washington State Governor's Art Collection in the Olympia Capitol
Building.

Email: lgalutia@gmail.com
Website portfolio: www.galutia.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/lukegalutia
Google+:https://google.com/+LukeGalutia
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lgalutia
Linkedin: https:// www.linkedin.com/in/lukegalutia/
Tumblr: http://lgalutia.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/LukeGalutia/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The Perils of Art Marketing

April 30th, 2014

The Perils of Art Marketing

The Perils of Art Marketing


By: Luke galutia
originally posted on 2013-05-31
Galutia Gallery ( www.galutia.com )


Over the last year, I have had some eye opening experiences when it comes to selling my art. I discovered that not all organizations out there are for the benefit of the artist. I have been contacted via email multiple times by an organization that claims they will put together an art show for you as well as a online portfolio of your work for the humble price of $2000 to $3000 dollars, which gives full coverage of your art in the U.S. and China. These are known as “Vanity Galleries”, and they charge you high prices just display your art.

Fortunately I did my homework before submitting art to this disreputable company. What I found was pretty shocking. It turns out that the “gallery” in question was actually just a “graveyard” for art that the company collected from the artist, that never sees the light of day. The package they were selling was a scam. From what the articles I read on the web indicated, the people that they hired to promote their deal, like starting artist, and art marketers, were told to put high pressure sales on artists in order to sign them up for the contract. once they got the artist to sign on, the paintings were put in a back room and very little attempt was made to promote the artist at all. the people who worked for the company often times were so frustrated that the quit working there as it was a disillusioning experience for both the marketer and the artist alike.

The words of advice my college animation teacher, once told me, rings very true - “You need to be as innocent as a dove but wise as a serpent - or otherwise people will take advantage of you, and make them very rich while seeing nothing in return for your labor...” As an artist, it is an overwhelming experience just even trying to get your painting into a gallery, let alone, becoming a success at it. As I am sure most other artists experience this, when you get an email from what seems to be a prestigious “New York Gallery and Magazine”, your hope shoots up and you start to stumble over yourself trying to jump at the opportunity.

The emails look very convincing when you get them, and to a starting unsuspecting artist it is very misleading. Here is an example that another artist got as an email:

"Dear Mr. **********, My name is ******* ********. I am a curator and publicist based in New York City. I wanted to let you know that I really enjoy your visceral landscapes. Each piece conveys a sense of endless wonder and imagination. Your stylistic approach reminds me of reflections, memories and dreams combined with reality. I find these works to be thoughtful, moving, and I'd like to know more about them. I am contacting you on behalf of the ******** Magazine. We would like to publish a full page of your work in print and online. In addition, I also want to exhibit your work at ********* Gallery and represent your painting(s) for an entire year. We are particularly interested in the work entitled "***********", but we are open to your suggestions. This is a strong opportunity to promote and present your art in New York City.

The fee for a full year worth of promotion is $1,900 - for online & print media, publishing in our catalogue, gallery exhibition, and production costs. Here is a sample of our work: **********”

As it turns out, information on the online forums, is that the publication is a small the gallery on the 4th floor and is not easily accessible. They bill themselves as being a major gallery downtown New York, but it is in what “use to be” a major art place during the 60’s - but now is dead in the art community.

By doing just a little research I ended up saving myself ALOT of heart ache over losing my art in the void of the internet. Only a bit of a bruised ego over the deal - feeling like a sucker for getting my hopes up. Good opportunities are out there. Take heart - the universe is a friendly place, and it will bring what you need, when you need it, when you open your heart to faith. As a way of giving back to the universe and the art world, I wanted to post this as a warning to other artist whom might be struggling and looking for the big break. I wanted to give some links of where to start and blogs and information articles, that I found enlightening and helpful.

1) As a service to the arts community the company that hosts my webpage provides a searchable database of known internet art scams. You can search the names, email address, and web pages names in their search options. This is a BIG help. thanks FASO! Here is the link:

http://faso.com/art-scam/

2) Here is a really good blog I would suggest every starting artist read. The lady who produces this blog is an art marketing consultant, and she writes about online art contest contract scams. It can be found here:

http://mariabrophy.com/business-of-art/artists-beware-of-these-red-flags-in-licensing-contracts.html

She has many other great articles as well.

3) Here is another site dedicated to exposing art market scams:

http://www.artwatchdog.com/

4) Here is an article on forbes.com about art scams from China:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/abigailesman/2012/08/13/chinas-13-billion-art-fraud-and-what-it-means-for-you/

A word to the starting artists out there in internetland - be as harmless as doves, and wise as serpents. You work hard to produce wonderful creations of the Inner Mind - protect those creations by being vigilant.

- Luke galutia
2013-05-31

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Luke Galutia has been in the fine arts since 1989, and has won awards for
his art. His artwork has been recognized as being cutting-edge Optical
Illusion Art, and is hosted as part of a permanent collection in the
Washington State Governor's Art Collection in the Olympia Capitol
Building.

Email: lgalutia@gmail.com
Website portfolio: www.galutia.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/lukegalutia
Google+:https://google.com/+LukeGalutia
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lgalutia
Linkedin: https:// www.linkedin.com/in/lukegalutia/
Tumblr: http://lgalutia.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/LukeGalutia/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Provenance of a painting

April 30th, 2014

Provenance of a painting

Provenance of a painting
By: Luke Galutia
Posted 2014-04-29
Galutia Gallery ( www.galutia.com )

It has been a long time since I have written an artist blog. Those who know me, know I have tons of projects that I work on whenever I have free time - which is not that often. In that time I not only have running art projects, but science projects as well. So I thought it was about time to re-post my old blogs to the home of my new site on www.fineartamerica.com which hosts www.galutia.com.

This post I wanted to cover the topic of provenance. Provenance comes from the french word “provenir”, which means "to come from". It is the forensics and paper trail that a painting leaves throughout time and history. I have recently become addicted to watching episodes of BBC programs on youtube such as, “Fake or Fortune” and “The Forgers Masterclass”. I started getting interested in how mastermind art forgers were able to get their works into high level galleries and the paintings would sell for millions of dollars under the guise of another famous artist. What I was wondering was, what tools did they use in order to get their paintings in through all the red tape and safety measures that the art collector market world has in place. Maybe I thought I can use some of their technique to work for my art. Of course, not to pose as another artist, but to get my own name out there and get recognised. A way to “Hack” the art world so to speak.

It was through this research that I stumbled upon something profound about the art market that they never teach you in any of the art classes I have taken… When it comes to famous paintings, the paper trail the painting leaves, is in fact more important than the actual painting itself! During my youtube research, I saw many episodes where someone had a legitimate painting by someone like Monet which was worth millions of dollars, only to be turned down as worthless. This was due to some organizations at the top of the art food chain who controls “What is and isn’t a legitimate work of art” by the artist. This is mostly determined by a group called The Wildenstein Institute, who produce volumes of books on famous artists, called “Catalogue Raisonné - Critical Catalogue”. These books are prepared by people who specialize on a specific artist. If this group says that, if a painting is not an original work by a famous artist, the painting becomes completely worthless. From what I have seen in my research of youtube videos, there can even be compelling evidence that the painting did originated from the artist, but if it was deemed not authentic by an older member, they will not go against the original position on the artwork, or even accept new evidence to the contrary, which is astounding to me.

Along with the paper trail, there are many other tools which is used in the field of art forensics to determine the pigment of paint and binder (such as linseed oil), to see if it lines up historically to when the painting would have been created. Especially in the case of older artworks, they will look for traces of prussian blue to see if it was painted within the 20th century - which would mean its a fake, or lapis lusi to see if it was painted earlier - which would mean its authentic. Due to the fact that the artist previous to modern times, hand ground their own pigments from such things as lapis which sold pound for pound with gold in price, or cyanide which was used for the color vermilion, or led for white which was used a lot with underpainting. The use of these toxic chemicals, as you can guess, affected the health of many artist back in the day. The painting is take to someone who is specialised in art restoration and handling of old art, who helps to take a small sample of paint, canvas, paper or ink from the work in question. This sample is then taken to a chemical lab for analysis. They can determine luminance value of the pigment, or expose it to radiation and come up with the chemical composition of what elements make up the paint, or ink. They can also do a carbon date test to see when the paint was made.

Art forgers who are masters of deception, have even gone as far as to burn up old paper which dates to the time frame they are forging. They will mix the ask of the old paper with hand ground ink, in order to create a master forgery. they will use this technique to throw off the carbon dating. They also take blank paper from old books dating from the same time period they were trying to forge, to make the forgery look even more authentic. In one famous case in England, the mastermind of the art scam “social engineered” his way into a famous London art museum, where he had access to all the original documents of famous art works. He then began rewriting the art history of lesser known pieces of art, and doctored them to look like the forgeries he was trying to sell as legitimate works. In essence he was creating a fake provenance for the forgeries.

With all this taken to heart, my question becomes, what can we as artist do in order to validate our art for future generations, who may look back on our body of work, to see if its authentic? Here are some suggestions:

1) Take pictures of ALL your works of art:
Due to the fact that I live in a MAJOR tornado zone in Oklahoma City, I take photos of all my artworks. This way I have something to hand to the insurance company if we get hit by a tornado. Also it has the added benefit of allowing me to offer prints of my artwork at a cheaper, more affordable price on my website. By having a collection of pictures it can help to assure future generations that the works are legitimate.

2) Document EVERYTHING about the painting:
It would be best to keep a written diary of the artwork, what it looks like, what its made out of, time it was made, art statements, new clips about the artwork, press releases, who it was sold to and for how much, etc. This helps to establish the paper trail for the artwork which will later become its provenance. Think of it this way, some future art historian will be grateful to your time, effort, diligence, and dedication for protecting your own art.

3) Keep digital backups in multiple locations:
If you live in a dangerous weather zone like I do, then it is a smart idea to create a burnt dvd copy of the pictures and documents of your artwork. A bad example can be taken from many of the businesses in New Orleans when hurricane Katrina hit. Most of their computer backups were in the business office across the street from their server farms. Alot of those companies lost valuable data because their backup was “on site”. You should find a relative you trust, that you can send copies of your digital backups to. You might also look into cloud storage, however it is a good idea to have a physical backup in place.

4) Keep great business records:
Having one central account for your business records is a good thing to have. Both printed and digital copies. In the event like a hurricane, tornado, or earthquake, and even a fire and flood, anything paper will be burnt up, torn to shreds, or turned to pulp. Having a digital backup will preserve it forever… theoretically.

5) Take videos:
Taking videos of your artwork. Having a video journal on someplace like youtube, not only helps to inspire other artist, it can be a future way to verify a painting you are working on in the video. It can also give future art historians key insights into the way you work. If you think that this is a bit out there, just look at the artist Andy Warhol. He video taped and audio recorded EVERYTHING. Every moment of his life was recorded on to a reel to reel tape deck. He even recorded the moment he found out his mother died. These are now kept in the Andy Warhol museum in pittsburgh in “Time capsules”. He is one of the most well documented artist of the 20th century.

6) Use acid free museum quality sketchbooks and journals:
If you do preliminary sketches of your artwork, you might have a sketchpad or journal book on hand in which you do your drawings. Make sure when you purchase these from the art store that the label says “Museum quality acid free”. The same goes for writing implements, pens, pencils, markers etc. The reason why is, paper which has any acid on it will deteriorate quicker over time. Often times in order to authenticate an artwork, art historians will go the the existing body of work of the artist. This includes sketches of the painting. A good example would be leonardo's sketch books. By using journals which are acid free, it ensures that they will last for a longer amount of time.

What you can take away from this article is this: Make a history for yourself. Don’t leave it up to art historians to guess about who you are, what you meant, or what paintings you actually did. Take control of your own history now. Future art historians will thank you later. So will the owners of your prestigious original works.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Luke Galutia has been in the fine arts since 1989, and has won awards for
his art. His artwork has been recognized as being cutting-edge Optical
Illusion Art, and is hosted as part of a permanent collection in the
Washington State Governor's Art Collection in the Olympia Capitol
Building.

Email: lgalutia@gmail.com
Website portfolio: www.galutia.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/galutiagallery
Google+:https://google.com/+LukeGalutia
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lgalutia
Linkedin: https:// www.linkedin.com/in/lukegalutia/
Tumblr: http://lgalutia.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/LukeGalutia/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



External links:
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1) Wildenstein Institute Catalogue Raisonné Critical Catalogue
http://www.wildenstein-institute.fr/spip.php?page=wildenstein-catalogue-raisonne-catalogue-critique&lang=en

2) Wikipedia article on Provenance
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Provenance#Researching_the_provenance_of_paintings

3) Art business article on Provenance
http://www.artbusiness.com/provwarn.html


4) Getty Research Institute Database
http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/provenance/faq.html


5) BBC Your paintings - site hosted by the BBC for researching lost paintings
in order to establish their provenance.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/



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Art Journaling

April 30th, 2014

Art Journaling

By: Luke Galutia
Posted 2014-04-30
Galutia Gallery ( www.galutia.com )


In my last blog post, I talked about provenance and establishing an art history for yourself, and future followers of your works. In my last recommendation I brought up the quality of paper and writing implements for creating your sketches and journals.

In the past, I very rarely ever drew a preliminary sketch. One of my college art teachers just about wanted to strangle me, because I predominantly painted out of my head, and usually planned anywhere from 3 to 10 paintings in advance of what I was painting at the time. It wasn’t until this last few years that I decided to get a sketchbook specifically for writing sketches and designs of preliminary works that I had in mind. Only with in about the last month have I been faithfully working on sketches everyday. The problem has been, making it a habit.

Having a good sketchbook is a great tool for an artist. I cannot count how many ideas I come up with on a daily basis, but don’t write it down due to lack of time, or just plain laziness. Even though I will have thousands of images that come to mind, when I get the time to get in front of a canvas, my mind will sometimes go blank. Or sometimes I will get stuck on a painting and then put it up for a few months before coming back to it, as I can’t make the image work correctly in my head before putting it into paint. So recently I have taken to the practice of having a sketch journaling book. These are sketches of ideas that pop into my mind over the course of a day. It has helped me in working out the details of creating a new style for my art, which is something that I feel I have needed for a while.

The eventual goal is to create a multi volume work of sketches, from which I can have a library of imagery to choose from. This is to help prevent a writers block type situation. Many times, when I am stuck on a painting, I will look around the room at my other paintings. I will ask myself, “Ok what did I do on those other paintings?”. I use this as a way to work around the block. To better combat this situation, I now try to draw sketches whenever I get some free time. I also make sure to date the drawing as well. I use what I draw as a “design element”, similar to the way you would use clip art in photoshop. This can give you the ability to use and reuse the same design in different ways, and expand upon its original concept. Remember it doesn’t have to be perfect! Even if it is just there to be a mental reminder. In some of my sketches I will even write down what colors go in specific areas.

For choosing a sketch journal, go to the art store like Michaels and look around their drawing area. They have many options to choose from. Look for a size which is comfortable for you to accurately draw what you have in your mind. The book I use is about 11 X 9 inches. I made sure before I bought it, that it was acid free and museum grade paper. This ensures that over time the quality of the paper will last. Something that I also do is label each volume. Say like the one I am working on now will be Volume #1 2013-2014 or something like that. This way it will help future art historians looking over the provenance of my work to establish a timeline. Remember, the more you put down on paper and in notes about your work, the greater the provenance will be on your artwork in the future.

For writing implements you can also look in the same section and you will find professional pencils, pens and markers. These have high quality materials, such as the felt that is use in the marker tips, and the ink is acid free and based on india ink. India ink should last for quite a long time.

Another type of journal you might want to think about is a “Provenance Journal”. After completing a work of art, write down the time, date, name of the painting, medium, size and material (such as paper or canvas). Then write down your experience or thoughts on the work of art you have created. What were your feelings or moods while you created? Did the act of painting it take you to some place fantastic in your minds eye? Did it create a new experience for you, or a new revelation of an art style you wish to carry on and expand upon in your next work of art? Do you have any ideas for new paintings that are not fully formed yet, or specific subject matter which you want to try out? This might sound kind of tedious, but one of the reasons we know about the life of Van Gogh as an artist, is the fact that he wrote down what his experiences in art and life to his brother Theo. He even wrote about his frustration at the art galleries in France not taking or selling his art.

Something I have always maintained as an art history geek, is that more important than the painting, is the artist his / her self. Think about it, when people auction off famous paintings at someplace like christie's art auction, they are not just buying the painting, they are investing in the value, name, and history of that artist. For me, artist such as Juan Miro, Salvador Dali, or Frida Kahlo (whom my wife refers to as the “Selfy-Queen”), had very interesting, if not painful lives. They were REAL people, who had REAL problems. It shows in their artwork - the expression of who they were. By keeping a “Provenance Journal”, you are giving future art historians the ability to peer into your life, to better understand what is transpiring in your day to day activities. They can follow with you through the hills and valleys of your success. Art blogs like this are great things too, but I feel that it is best to also keep a written record as well. Technology such as the internet can be a very temporal beast. It is subject to hardware failure, upgrades, sites getting hacked, data loss, and natural disasters. Journals which are written on acid free Museum quality paper, last a lot longer historically. Its something to think about in our digital age.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Luke Galutia has been in the fine arts since 1989, and has won awards for
his art. His artwork has been recognized as being cutting-edge Optical
Illusion Art, and is hosted as part of a permanent collection in the
Washington State Governor's Art Collection in the Olympia Capitol
Building.

Email: lgalutia@gmail.com
Website portfolio: www.galutia.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/galutiagallery
Google+:https://google.com/+LukeGalutia
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lgalutia
Linkedin: https:// www.linkedin.com/in/lukegalutia/
Tumblr: http://lgalutia.tumblr.com/
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/LukeGalutia/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~